The Unit

The American Legion Auxiliary unit is where grassroots work of the Auxiliary takes place. There are more than 8,000 ALA units nationwide. At the local level, The American Legion is called a post, and the Auxiliary is called a unit. 

All ALA units are attached to a Legion post, taking its name, location, and number (e.g., John P. Hand American Legion Auxiliary Unit 250), but units are not obligated to meet at the Legion post. If the post is no longer active, a unit may continue to function as what’s called a widow unit. Sons of The American Legion groups within Legion posts at the community level are referred to as squadrons.

How to Organize a New Unit

The first step in the organization of an American Legion Auxiliary unit is to create interest among those in the community who are eligible for Auxiliary membership and to secure authorization for the creation of an Auxiliary unit from the post. Charter application forms, individual membership applications, suggested Constitution & Bylaws and any other needed supplies or information may be obtained from department headquarters. Department officers are always ready to assist in installations and in providing expertise when needed.

eUnits

Electronic units (eUnits) allow members to communicate and hold meetings via teleconferencing, email, an online group or other e-meeting software. Designed for working members and students attending college, the eUnit format also provides a great opportunity for those unable to leave their home to remain involved in the American Legion Auxiliary. In addition to electronic communication, eUnit members do meet in person occasionally as required by their unit’s Constitution & Bylaws. 

Start a New Unit

Interested in starting a new unit? Download these helpful resources

"I remember going down to the Legion post with my grandfather [World War II U.S. Army veteran Howard Schlitter], and hearing him say things like, “You’ve got to take care of the veterans. You’ve got to be there for them and help them out.” None of that really resonated with me until after he was gone. Then, I realized I have to be his voice."
- Mike Monserud, ALA member of Auxiliary Unit 37 in Ames, Iowa

READ MIKE'S STORY

 

   

 

- 4 million hours of Auxiliary mission outreach services are volunteered annually for veterans and military families. Come join us -