Displaying Blue Star Banners

Families are encouraged to display the banner in the window of a home when a loved one is serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

The blue star represents one family member serving, and a banner can have up to five stars, according to The American Legion, which helped reintroduce the Blue Star Banner to Americans following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks by providing banners to military families across the nation. If the individual is killed in action or dies, a smaller gold star is placed over it. Gold stars are placed above the blue stars or to the top right of the flag, in the event a flag represents multiple servicemembers.

The Blue Star Service Banner was designed and patented in 1917 by World War I Army Capt. Robert L. Queisser of the 5th Ohio Infantry. His two sons served on the front line. His banner quickly became the unofficial symbol for parents with a child in active military service.

Order a Blue Star Banner from The American Legion National Emblem Sales at (888) 453-4466, or online.


“I am proud to be an ALA member. Through its programs, the Auxiliary gives me the opportunity to educate myself about how to help veterans, the troops, their families, and my community,”
Maria Moss, member of ALA Unit 149, and American Legion Riders – Chapter 149, both in Las Vegas.

READ MARIA'S STORY

 

 

- 4 million hours of Auxiliary mission outreach services are volunteered annually for veterans and military families. Help us make a difference. -